** Sign up to our newsletter for 10% off right now  +   Free Shipping across the USA with all orders **

0

Your Cart is Empty

Mosquito-borne Diseases Affecting Travelers

May 27, 2017

Image of a lone man hiking in the hills

US residents who travel to other countries, or even certain areas of the southern United States, can return with mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, and zika virus.

A mosquito biting a human arm

People who travel to other areas of the world may be at risk and should be familiar with the symptoms of these diseases.  Medications used to prevent infection are available for malaria and vaccines are currently available for yellow fever.  Avoidance of mosquito bites and use of mosquito repellent are recommended when traveling to affected areas.

Chikungunya virus is primarily found in Africa and Asia yet was found in 2013 for the first time in the Western Hemisphere.

Image of an empty beach with palm trees
Dengue fever is primarily a tropical disease and rarely occurs within the continental United States. It is however quite common in the Caribbean and in the Virgin Islands. In recent years, Dengue has also occurred in southern states, including Texas and Florida.

Malaria is still a public health concern in North America even though local exposure to the disease hasn’t occurred in nearly 100 years.

Yellow Fever virus is a rare tropical illness with vaccination being one of the most important steps in prevention. However, a recent outbreak and upsurge in reported cases in Brazil (371 cases reported, with 241 deaths up to March 2017) has caused concern amongst the US medical profession that it could spread into city populations and then further afield. 

Zika Virus has been responsible for outbreaks in tropical areas throughout the world and was found in 2015 for the first time in the Western Hemisphere in much of the Caribbean, The Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and mainland USA.

If you care to read more about the habits of these airborne pests here.

Our Bug Repellents can help keep the carriers of these diseases away; prevention is always better than a cure!  

But please note that no repellent is guaranteed to be 100% effective, so you should always re-apply frequently as required by the environment you are travelling in, so please read our other blog advice on how best to apply your Bug Repellent effectively!  

Medical advice should always be sought if you consider you may have been infected in anyway! 

Best regards and safe travels,

Rebecca

from The Solid Bar Company Team

 

Other Useful References:


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.

Subscribe